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2 edition of Saxon charters and field names of Gloucestershire found in the catalog.

Saxon charters and field names of Gloucestershire

George Beardoe Grundy

Saxon charters and field names of Gloucestershire

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Published by Bristol & Gloucestershire Archaeological Society in [Gloucester] .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statement[by] G.B. Grundy.
ContributionsBristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society.
The Physical Object
Pagination306 p. ;
Number of Pages306
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17349408M

The Journal of the English Place-Name Society has been published annually since The Journal contains articles, book reviews, bibliographies, and occasionally addenda and corrigenda to the county survey volumes, along with the EPNS reports and accounts for the preceding year. It is issued free to full and associate members of the Society. the name atwood is believed to have been of saxon origin. reliable sources place its beginning at coulsdon, a parish in surrey county, 12 miles south of london and adjoining croydon and sanderstead. the unusual compounding of the preposition (atte) with the noun (wudu) distinguishes the atwood name from other local names.


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Saxon charters and field names of Gloucestershire by George Beardoe Grundy Download PDF EPUB FB2

Saxon Charters and Field Names of Gloucestershire, Volumes George Beardoe Grundy Council of the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society, - Names, Geographical.

Saxon charters and field names of Gloucestershire. Gloucester, Published by the Council of the Bristol and Gloucestershire archeological Society, [] (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: G B Grundy.

Saxon Charters and Field Names of Gloucestershire: By G. Grundy Part 1 of Saxon Charters and Field Names of Gloucestershire: By G.

Grundy, George Beardoe Grundy: Author: George Beardoe Grundy: Publisher: Council of the Bristol and Gloucestershire archeological society, Export Citation: BiBTeX EndNote RefMan. Saxon Charters and Field Names of Gloucestershire: By G. Grundy Part 2 of Saxon Charters and Field Names of Gloucestershire: By G.

Grundy, Saxon Charters and Field Names of Gloucestershire: By G. Grundy: Author: George Beardoe Grundy: Publisher: Council of the Bristol and Gloucestershire archeological society, Export CitationReviews: 1. Addeddate Identifier Identifier-ark ark://t8ff8w Ocr ABBYY FineReader Ppi.

Ina book entitled ‘Saxon Charters and field names of Gloucestershire’ was published which contained all the known boundary clauses for pre. Gloucestershire (Grundy, ). This was supplemented in by ‘The early Charters of the West Midlands’ (Finberg, ) which contained other charters and boundary clauses.

A two volume set of this reference guide to Saxon Gloucestershire. Complete in two volumes. These volumes contain a series Anglo-Saxon of charters which indicate the early topography of Gloucestershire.

Anglo-Saxon charters are documents from the early medieval period in England, which typically made a grant of land, or recorded a privilege. The Anglo-Saxon Charters of Stoke Bishop: A Study of The Boundaries of Bisceopes Stoc. An original article from the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society Higgins, David H.

This banner text can have markup. web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation. Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published.

Author of Saxon charters and field names of Gloucestershire G.B Grundy | Open Library. North Cerney is a village and civil parish in the English county of Gloucestershire, and lies within the Cotswolds, a range of hills designated an Area of Outstanding Natural village is 4 miles ( km) north of Cirencester within the Churn valley.

It was recorded as Cernei in the Domesday Book. However, the North Cerney parish boundaries were known to exist in Country: England. Grundy, G. B., Saxon Charters and Field Names of Gloucestershire () Harris, H.

W., Origin of District & Street Names in Bristol (; TS, Bristol Central Library) Hart, Gwen, A History of Cheltenham (). Yet surviving charters of Westbury do not mention a minster there until a grant of to Westmynster.

20Anglo-Saxon Charters (), nos., Directional names compounded with church or minster may indicate ecclesiastical dependencies, just as names like Easton suggest a town to the east of an existing settlement.

21 J. Pauntley in The first documentary reference to Pauntley and the other areas which make up the later parish is in Domesday Book in There are no Anglo-Saxon charters surviving for this part of Gloucestershire and no other surviving records before this time. However, place-names in the parish indicate earlier settlement here.

The name “Pauntley” [ ]. This thesis relates to the earliest West Saxon charters, that is those dating from the period c. to the end of the reign of Ecgberht in The Place-Names of Gloucestershire, ().

The Place-Names of Surrey (Cambridge, (). The Place-Names of Worcestershire, (). The Saxon Charters and Field Names of SomersetAuthor: Heather Edwards. Ina book entitled ‘Saxon Charters and field names of Gloucestershire’ was published which contained all the known boundary clauses for pre.

Gloucestershire (Grundy, ). This was supplemented in by ‘The early Charters of the West Midlands’ (Finberg, ) which contained other charters and boundary clauses. A copy can be found in the British Museum and a translation by Dr.

G.B. Grundy in “Saxon Charters and Field Names of Gloucestershire”. In the Domesday Book compiled in Gloucester init states that the Church of St. Mary de Malmesbury, Littleton is in the Langley hundred, having a priest and thirty acres of meadow. Some Place-Names in the Immediate Area of the Staffordshire Hoard Mattias Jacobsson (Jönköping University) Introduction.

The names of the towns, hamlets and other settlements in the area surrounding the findspot of the Staffordshire hoard comprise a mixed lot. Place-names of Gloucestershire: Pt. 4 (Survey of English Place-Names) Besides a classified index of field and minor names the volume also includes indexes of names containing identifiable personal names and saints' names, and of Anglo-Saxon charters, as well as the customary general index.

In an end-pocket are a county map, showing hundreds Format: Hardcover. Here the evidence is examined for the West Midlands – the counties of Worcestershire, Warwickshire and Gloucestershire, much of which formed the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of the Hwicce.

Della Hooke reveals the intimate local landscape through the medium of place names, contemporary documents and archaeological by: The Kingdom of the South Saxons, today referred to as the Kingdom of Sussex (/ ˈ s ʌ s ɪ k s /; Old English: Sūþseaxna rīce), was one of the seven traditional kingdoms of the Heptarchy of Anglo-Saxon England.

On the south coast of the island of Great Britain, it was originally a sixth-century Saxon colony and later an independent South Saxons were ruled by the Capital: Chichester, Selsey (seat of South Saxon.

Names and Surnames of All the Able and Sufficient Men in Body Fit for His Majesty's Service in the Wars, within the County of Gloucester, compiled by John Smith, () Taylor, Map of. GLOUCESTER. Kingsholm, half a mile to the north of Gloucester, in order to secure the crossing of the Severn, and then at some time after A.D a legionary fortress was established on the site of the city itself.9 This key position was essential forFile Size: 4MB.

Grundy, G. B., Saxon Charters and Field Names of Gloucestershire, Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society (Bristol, ).

See cited charters; Herald's Exhibition: Herald's Commemorative Exhibition held at the College of Arms (). See cited charters. Saxon Charters and Field Names of Gloucestershire, Seigniorial Agriculture, ().Author: Christopher Dyer. The Origin of Anglo – Saxon race “ Origin of the Anglo – Saxon race ” is a book published in by Thomas William Shore, author of 'a history of Hampshire,' etc, Honorary secretary London and Middlesex archaeological society; honorary Organizing secretary of the Hampshire field club and Archaeological : Oldeuropeanculture.

The primary sources for the location of the battle are Asser's Life of King Alfred, which names the place as "Ethandun" and the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, which has chronicle was compiled during the reign of Alfred the Great and is thus a contemporary record.

It is believed that Asser's Life was originally written in ; however, no contemporary manuscript on: Probably Edington, Wiltshire. History. Some deer parks were established in the Anglo-Saxon era and are mentioned in Anglo-Saxon Charters; these were often called hays (from Old English heġe (“hedge, fence”) and ġehæġ (“an enclosed piece of land”).

After the Norman conquest of England in William the Conqueror seized existing game reserves. Deer parks flourished and proliferated under the. The Names and Surnames of All the Able and Sufficient Men in Body Fit for His Majesty's Service in the Wars, within the County of Gloucester, compiled by John Smith (Lond.

) Taylor, Dom. Glos. Taylor, Analysis of the Domesday Survey of. Corhampton is not attested in Anglo-Saxon charters, though early place-names within Corhampton Parish occur in Droxford and Exton charters (Grundy 40; and see below). The church recorded in the Domesday account refers to the present-day church, which preserves late Saxon architecture and a sundial (Taylorv.

1: ). Saint Kenelm (or Cynehelm) was an Anglo-Saxon saint, venerated throughout medieval England, and mentioned in the Canterbury Tales (the Nun's Priest's Tale, lines –, in which the cockerel Chaunteecleer tries to demonstrate the reality of prophetic dreams to his wife Pertelote).

William of Malmesbury, writing in the 12th century, recounted that "there was no place in Died: 17 JulyClent Hills.

Peter de Wyckhurst was born about He is the son of Peter Wyckhurst In A. one Peter Wyckhurst bought outright from the Abbey of Chertsey, the 40 acre Estate in Coulsdon Parish, County Surrey, now known as Hooley House. "Mynsters and Parishes: Some Evidence and Conclusions from Wiltshire" published on 16 Mar by Brill.

Here the evidence is examined for the West Midlands -- the counties of Worcestershire, Warwickshire and Gloucestershire, much of which formed the Anglo--Saxon kingdom of the Hwicce. Della Hooke reveals the intimate local landscape through the medium of place names, contemporary documents and archaeological evidence.

The transformation of Birmingham from the purely rural manor recorded in the Domesday Book started decisively inwith the purchase by the Lord of the Manor Peter de Birmingham of a royal charter from Henry II permitting him to hold a weekly market "at his castle at Birmingham" and to charge tolls on the market's traffic.

This was one of the earliest of the two thousand. Baddeley,W. (), 'Herefordshire place-names', Transactions of the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Soci Chiesa di San Leonardo di Author: Keith Briggs. Cornwall (/ ˈ k ɔːr n w ɔː l,-w əl /; Cornish: Kernow [ˈkɛrnɔʊ]) is a ceremonial county in South West England, bordered to the north and west by the Celtic Sea, to the south by the English Channel, and to the east by Devon, the River Tamar forming the border between them.

Cornwall is the westernmost part of the South West Peninsula of the island of Great tuent country: England. Gloucestershire is a historic county mentioned in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle in the 10th century, though the areas of Winchcombe and the Forest of Dean were not added until the late 11th century.

Gloucestershire originally included the "small town" of : Mossflower. Sir Robert Atkyns’s Ancient and Present State of Glostershire, which appeared inwas the first published survey of the county.

Alan Pilbeam’s Gloucestershire Years Ago is written to celebrate Atkyns’s achievement and to present his information in a Author: Alan Pilbeam.

Author names starting with Grs - Grz: /] Ancient Gems In Modern Settings [n❷ A History Of The Greek And Roman World [n❷ Saxon Charters Of Worcestershire [n❷ Saxon Oxfordshire (ed) [n❷ Saxon Charters And Field Names Of Gloucestershire [n❷ The Saxon Charters And Field Names Of Somerset [n❷ Fifty-Five.

Somerset (/ ˈ s ʌ m ər s ɛ t / or locally / ˈ z ʌ m ər z ɛ t /; archaically, Somersetshire) is a county in South West England which borders Gloucestershire and Bristol to the north, Wiltshire to the east, Dorset to the south-east and Devon to the south-west. It is bounded to the north and west by the Severn Estuary and the Bristol Channel, its coastline facing southeastern tuent country: England.- The Place names of Gloucestershire part III: The lower Severn Valley; The Forest of Dean - The Place names of Gloucestershire part IV: Introduction, bibliography, analyses, index, maps - Men and armour for Gloucestershire in primary sources ranging from the Antonine Itinerary and Saxon Charters to local place and field names.

He was concerned also to distinguish as far as possible between early (i.e. ‘British’) and Roman alignments, in a way that had not been done before to the same degree.

The title page of the Archaeological handbook.